Guest Posts

We welcome guest posts from historians of crime/punishment, London historians, family historians – or any other researchers using Old Bailey Online and related sources. You don’t need to have any previous experience of blogging. Although they must be factually accurate, blog posts do not need to be as ‘finished’ as traditional published articles. Ideally, they should be written engagingly with a general audience in mind.

Posts should not be longer than about 3000 words (but if you do need to say more than that, it could be split into instalments). All primary sources must be referenced, either in footnotes or by means of hyperlinks where accessible online. Illustrations are welcome, but you should ensure that they’re in the public domain or you have permission to reproduce them, and provide any necessary acknowledgments and references within the post.

There are two ways guest posts can be published:

1. If you have a WordPress.com account, or are willing to open one (you don’t have to set up a blog to have an account), you can be signed up as a contributor to the blog so that you can post here directly. This has several benefits – you can format your post exactly the way you want it to appear (which also saves me some work!), and you’ll be more visibly and effectively credited as author of the post.

2. If you don’t want to do that, you can send your draft to me and I’ll re-format and post it for you. Please bear in mind that if I’m very busy, this might take a little while. You should avoid complex formatting, and if you want to include images please send them as attached files, clearly stating in the post itself where they should be inserted, and providing full citation details and any copyright information (no more than 2-3 images please). References should be provided as endnotes.

Please email oldbailey@sheffield.ac.uk if you’d like to contribute!

A note on copyright: you retain all rights in your posts (texts and images), unless you explicitly decide to state otherwise (eg by using a Creative Commons license). However, you should note that wordpress.com has a “reblog” feature, which enables other wordpress.com bloggers to share an extract from your post as a new post on their own blogs, containing a link back to the original, full post. I believe this is a positive thing, which will help to bring more readers to your post, but you should be aware that (as far as I know) it is not possible to prevent its use.